How to Build Your Own Music Teaching Studio

by Daniel Patterson

How to Build Your Own Music Teaching Studio

Aside from selling and marketing music, musicians these days have started teaching on the side to supplement their income. Being a music teacher can be a rewarding career path as you get to be surrounded by music every day all while imparting your passion and knowledge with your students.

But building a music teaching studio is easier said than done. Even if you have a good mind for business, which you most likely already do if you make your living via music, getting started can be tough. In the beginning, you may not know how to recruit students or make your venture profitable. If you’re willing to roll up your sleeves and make an effort in building your business, it can pay off in the long run. 

Here are some tips on how to build a thriving music studio: 

Work on your branding.

You have to remember that you’re not the only music teacher out there. Many others are trying to sell their services as well. It would help you started treating yourself and your studio as a product, just like any other product that someone would create, package, and sell. After all, you’re essentially offering a service to clients, and you need to sell it well. And when it comes to getting the attention of potential students, you need to prove to them that they’re worth investing in. 

To do this, you need a unique selling proposition (USP). You can begin by listing the things that make your service or your studio unique. Whether it’s having a doctorate in music or having years of performance experience under your belt, you need to figure out what makes you stand out from the pack and design your brand’s messaging around it. That way, you’ll have positioned yourself as an expert and give people a reason to hire you. 

Figure out who your ideal client is.

Once you know what makes you unique, the next step is to think about who your ideal client or student is. This will help you figure out where and how you should advertise your services. If your ideal clientele is people on the hunt for discounts, then your advertisement will be different from if you live in an upscale neighborhood or if you’ll be working with students studying for competitions, etc. The key here is to know who your ideal client is and what their pain points are. 

Gather the right resources and materials.

Nothing screams pro like a well-equipped studio and appropriate resources. You need to be well-prepared to serve the needs of your students. Make sure your studio has everything you need to facilitate effective learning, like tuners, amplification, a metronome, and paper and writing instruments. If you’re using method books, ensure that you have a copy at your studio as well. If you’re distributing exercises amongst your students, make it a point that you have prints to give during lessons. 

Teach!

After everything’s set up, your top priority should be to teach great lessons. You managed to pitch your service and now it’s time to show them what you’re made of. If you do a great job, your students will most likely tell everyone about what you do, and the word will start to spread about your teaching studio. 

If you have plans on building a music studio, or maybe you already have but still want to grow it further, Grow Your Music Studio can help you attract and keep new students. Check out our site to find tools and resources that can assist you with rapidly scaling your studio or music school.

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Daniel Patterson is a private teacher, writer, and marketing consultant for music schools. He began teaching in 2004. He co-founded and led marketing operations for a summer music camp that sees over 200 children each summer.

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